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Naturopathic and holistic mental health treatment

Naturopathic and holistic mental health treatment
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This guest article is by a naturopathic physician in Portland, Oregon USA, who specializes in mental health treatment for children and adults.  Following is a summary and link of a podcast about the use of holistic/alternative medicine for the treatment of ADHD.

Addressing Mental Health Issues From a Holistic Perspective
Krista Tricarico, ND.  www.openmindmedicine.com

Holistic treatment

The health of the mind and body are intricately linked. Just as our thoughts strongly influence our physical health, our individual physiology affects our mental and emotional well-being. The foods we eat, our digestive health, the toxins in our environments, our hormones, lifestyles, experiences, beliefs and attitudes all play important roles in our physiology and biochemical make-up. As a philosophy, holistic mental health recognizes this beautiful web of interdependency.

Holistic approaches for adults and children can be used in conjunction with psychiatric medication, but unlike pharmaceuticals, holistic mental health treatments usually have the “side effect” of improved physical health and a richer emotional experience. Rather than suppressing or covering up symptoms with a drug, the goal of treatment is to address underlying causes and work towards integration and balance.

As a naturopathic physician, my goal is to support the wisdom of the body and mind and facilitate an individual’s inherent ability to heal. Naturopathic Doctors (ND’s) are licensed primary care physicians who have attended a four-year, postgraduate-level naturopathic medical school and are clinically trained in the art and science of natural therapies. In addition to conventional diagnosis, laboratory testing and pharmaceutical medications, the scope of naturopathic medicine includes nutrition, counseling, homeopathy, botanical medicine, physical therapies, and mind-body approaches. Naturopathic training does encompass the same basic bio-medical sciences as conventional medical training, but the approach to health and disease differs considerably. It is the philosophy of naturopathy that clearly differentiates this medicine and directs how we approach each patient.

Treatments

This will look different for each person and will be guided by conversation and individual interests as well as physical exam and laboratory analysis when appropriate. I have found the following therapies to be key factors in mental health recovery.

Counseling

Some patients see me primarily for counseling, and people with this focus are welcomed. Others are either interested in a blend of counseling and naturopathic approaches or seek care strictly for holistic medical support. A young person’s treatment needs and interests also change over time, so I meet a patient where they are at this moment. My counseling approach has a strong emphasis on self-awareness and mindfulness. Self-observation coupled with an attitude of curiosity, openness and acceptance allows for conscious insight and more freedom in the responses to the stresses and challenges a young person faces daily. Mindfulness-based therapies are a particularly effective approach for depression, anxiety and addiction issues, and can lead to increased clarity and a sense of contentment.

Nutritional Therapies

The foods we eat have a direct impact on the chemistry of our bodies and brains and, therefore, on our mood, thoughts and behavior. Our brains require the correct balance of amino acids, fats, vitamins, minerals and glucose in order to function properly, and individual needs can vary drastically. I work with all patients, children and adults, to uncover their unique nutritional needs through history-taking, diet analysis and lab testing, and then help individuals address underlying biochemical imbalances through shifts in their diet and nutritional supplements. Food allergies or sensitivities can play a significant role in mental health, as well, and the removal of these foods from the diet can have a profound impact on one’s healing. Orthomolecular psychiatry is a field of medicine that has applied these nutrition-based therapies in the treatment of conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression and has helped shape my naturopathic practice.

For more information about orthomolecular medicine, visit www.orthomolecular.org.
For more information about food allergy testing, visit www.usbiotek.com.

Homeopathy

Homeopathy is a gentle yet powerful system of healing based on the principle of “like cures like.” People have observed since ancient times that a substance that causes an illness or symptom can, in very small doses, cure the same problem by stimulating the body’s intrinsic healing ability. Through an in-depth interview, I strive to understand a child’s unique physical, mental and emotional experiences and, after careful study, select the appropriate remedy. Homeopathy offers a safe and elegant treatment that is a natural complement to counseling and can be used alongside conventional medications and other naturopathic treatments. As a truly holistic and individualized form of medicine, it is particularly well-suited to psychological and psychiatric concerns. Although identifying the effective remedy can sometimes require patience and perseverance, the results of successful homeopathic treatment are profound and long-lasting.

Restoring Digestive Health

Many mental and emotional concerns have their origins in the gut. It is important to identify and treat conditions such as hypochlorhydria (low stomach acid), candida overgrowth, gut dysbiosis (a bacterial imbalance in our digestive tracts), parasites, inflammation, leaky gut (increased permeability of the intestinal wall), and food allergies as they have direct effects on brain function. Imbalances in the gut play a significant role in many neuropsychological conditions. Conversely, our emotions strongly influence our appetite and digestion. The nervous system and the digestive system are intricately linked by a constant exchange of chemical and electrical messages including nutrients and neurotransmitters. Anything that affects one realm is likely to affect the other, and I have found that addressing gastrointestinal health is often foundational in one’s mental health recovery.

Blood Sugar Balancing

The sugar in our blood is called glucose, and this is the primary fuel for our bodies. Being one of the most sensitive and demanding organs, our brains require a constant supply of this glucose to perform its never-ending functions. A healthy body is able to regulate the blood sugar to provide a consistent energy source for the brain; unfortunately, this function is commonly impaired. Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the body can’t sustain constant glucose levels and can be a causative factor in attention and behavior issues, anxiety, panic attacks, rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, insomnia and addiction. Elevated blood sugar over time not only leads to diabetes, heart disease and obesity but also mood and behavior disturbances, decreased mental functioning and dementia. Many psychiatric medications put people at additional risk for blood sugar problems only exacerbating this problem. Balancing your blood sugar is an important component of disease prevention and general health and will also support your mood, energy, metabolism and mental functioning.

Amino Acid Therapy

Supplementation with amino acids can help optimize neurotransmitter levels. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins that our bodies transform into neurotransmitters such as serotonin, melatonin, GABA, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine. These are the messenger molecules that allow our nerve cells to communicate and have a direct impact on our mood, learning, attention, pain and pleasure perception, sleep, energy, and thought processes. Most psychiatric drugs manipulate our body’s ability to process these neurotransmitters in an attempt to alter the levels of these important chemicals. Instead of, or in conjunction with, antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications, we can give the body the amino acids it needs to make more neurotransmitters and avoid the negative side effects of the drugs. Neurotransmitter testing is available and can help guide the treatments. Targeted amino acid therapy is a powerful tool for addressing a wide variety of mental health concerns and provides a safe and effective alternative to these medications.

For more information on amino acid therapy, visit www.neuroassist.com.

Balancing Hormones

Our hormones are produced and controlled by our endocrine glands and include chemical messengers such as thyroid hormone, cortisol from the adrenals, insulin from the pancreas, and estrogen, progesterone and testosterone from the reproductive organs. As parents of adolescents who are entering puberty know, hormonal change has a profound effect on behavior. Imbalances or disturbances in any of these interconnected systems can alter the way our brain functions. For example, thyroid dysfunction is an often-overlooked, underlying cause of depression, anxiety, poor memory and fatigue, and PMS is a well-recognized cause of mood swings, depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances. Helping the body regain its delicate hormonal balance can have far-reaching effects for the mind.

Detoxification / Heavy Metal Chelation

We are exposed to an extraordinary amount of toxins through our food supply, the air we breath, and even our tap water. Toxic exposures affect the health of our brains. When the body encounters more toxins than it can effectively process, it stores these chemicals in fat cells, and our brains are largely made up of fat. Some people are good detoxifiers. Others with autism, ADHD, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, depression, chronic fatigue, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are often not. Supporting detoxification and the safe elimination of toxins can be a key component to mental health recovery. I assist patients with appropriate detoxification strategies whether that is a gentle cleanse, a more intensive detox protocol or heavy metal chelation.

Mind / Body Treatments 

Mind/body treatments engage the power of your mind in your own process of healing. I use therapies such as breath work, meditation, memory reintegration, relaxation strategies, and Emotional Freedom Technique (www.emofree.com) to help patients move towards a state of awareness and peace. Reflecting on and connecting with one’s own spirituality can also be an effective stress-management tool. Learning to consciously calm the mind and relax the body has a powerful effect on our neurotransmitters, hormones and immune system, and ultimately our health and sense of well-being.

Dr. Krista, www.openmindmedicine.com


Foods that support brain and mental health

  • Avocado
  • Walnuts, almonds, other nuts and seeds
  • Salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, herring, trout
  • Ground flax seed
  • Brightly colored fruits and vegetables – eat the rainbow
  • 70% cacao and higher dark chocolate
  • Green tea (stone ground from whole tea leaves)
  • Berries:  acai, blueberry, cranberry, blackberry

Herbs and other alternatives that support brain and mental health 

  • Fish, cod liver or krill oil (if you could only have one thing, this would be it)
  • L-theanine or kava kava for calming and reducing anxiety
  • Turmeric, curry and other antioxidants
  • B-complex vitamins
  • Magnesium
  • Light therapy, for improved mood and energy

Substances that are bad for brain health

  • Alcohol
  • Artificial food coloring
  • Artificial sweeteners
  • Sugars: cane sugar, soft drinks, corn syrup
  • Hydrogenated/partially hydrogenated fats and trans fats (fried foods). Saturated fats are fine, it’s the hydrogenated and trans fats that are bad.  I actually highly recommend organic coconut oil
  • Nicotine, Marijuana, all other controlled substances

How do you like this article?  Please rate it at the top, thanks.

Integrative Management of ADHD – What the Evidence Suggests
By Richard Balon, MD | January 6, 2011

The use of complementary and alternative medicine treatments by children and adults with ADHD is the rule rather than the exception…more than half of parents who have children with ADHD treat their child’s symptoms with vitamins, dietary changes, and expressive therapies—but only a small minority tell their doctor. And roughly 8 out of 10 patients who use these treatments regard them as their primary therapy.

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Teen rights vs. parent rights when the teen has a mental disorder

Teen rights vs. parent rights when the teen has a mental disorder
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 If you’re a parent of a troubled teen, how much decision making power should your child have?

How can your teenager possibly make decisions for themselves if they’re brains aren’t functioning normally?  They hate you, or they say and do crazy things for unfathomable reasons.  You want to guide them with incentives and consequences but these haven’t worked.  You’re traumatized by their history of unstable behavior and it affects your thinking.  Perhaps you get stuck in a power struggle, or you give up power because asserting your authority just puts gasoline on their fire.  You know they can make good on serious threats, such as running or causing serious personal or material damage.  Or they may completely fall apart.

Decent, caring parents, who aren’t out to “fix” or punish their child, often feel their teen has too many rights:

Problem – A teen’s statements to treatment providers are completely confidential after age 14.  Privacy is important, and the therapist needs the young person’s trust to help them with therapy, but some information could be shared with parents on a case-by-case, “need to know” basis.  A parent should be able to partner with the therapist, so they can structure interactions at home that support therapeutic goals.  For example, if the teen talks about dangerous activities with a best friend that the parent doesn’t know about, I think the parent could be coached to appropriately reduce contact with this friend or defuse the dangerous influence they have over the teen.  If a therapist can’t reveal this much, can’t they at least tell a parent what to watch for, what to set boundaries on?  How to respond?

 Problem – A teenager has the right to refuse medication or therapy at age 14 (in practice, most providers are reluctant to force treatment at any age).  But if their refusal leads to a serious crisis, I know from experience that most parents have no option but calling 911 or using force to keep themselves and others safe.  Yet force undermines the parent-child relationship, and has lead to undeserved charges of child abuse.

Problem – A young person has the right to refuse school attendance even when there are consequences, and the parent can be held liable for neglect.  This is of special concern to a parent who risks losing custody to the state or to a vindictive ex.

Problem – A teenager can commit a crime and a parent can lose custody.  Sometimes crime is the only way for a young person to get the help they need, but sometimes this means they descend, step-by-step, into a justice system that presumes bad parents create bad kids.

Parents of troubled teens need greater control over their situation, and lots of outside support, to prevent losing too much to the Black Hole of their child’s disability.   The emotional, physical, and financial costs to all family members are exceptionally high.  If a parent’s authority is undermined by a society that thinks they are the kid’s problem, and an education and health care system that focuses only on the child’s needs, the parent and family see their own rights being trampled.

What about a Parent Bill of Rights?

  1. Parents and families have a right to personal safety including the safety of pets, and the right to protect themselves, their belongings, and personal space.
  2. Parents have a right to ensure and sustain their financial, social, and job stability, even if it means periodically putting aside the teen’s needs.
  3. They have the authority to create house rules based on respect, safety, and shared responsibility.
  4. And they have the right to enforce houserules and expect them to be followed.
  5. Parents and families members have the right to be human and make mistakes.
  6. Parents and families have the right to take time out for their own well being and self-care.

When does a youth’s rights supersede a parent’s rights?

The youth, because of their disability, has a right to make progress at their own pace, and choose their own path of learning.  They also have the right to reasonable family accommodations because of their different needs.  Like any human being, especially one’s child, they have the right to respect and support regardless of inconvenience.  They also have the right to negotiate for what they want, and to expect earnest efforts towards compromise.  The last, and this is very important, they have the right to choose incentives and consequences that work best for them.

You know your teen will reach adulthood and independence whether they are ready or not.  They will do what they want, perhaps suffer serious consequences, and there’s nothing anyone can do about it.  So do something about it now.

Look at the future from their perspective. Young people in the mental health system face life needs and challenges different from peers. They often don’t reach 18 without experiencing significant setbacks due to their disorders.  They have missed opportunities for the education and life skills needed for adulthood, and lack of youthful achievements that boost confidence and self-esteem. Teens and young adults with disorders may have to manage these the rest of their lives!  Once age 18 is reached, supports they’ve depended on are abruptly dropped.  They are exported to an adult system where they must start from scratch to establish a new support network that will assist them towards an independent life.  Your job is to change from parent to mentor as these new supports are developed.

What are parent responsibilities?

Acceptance:  this is the nature of your child and it’s OK.  They will still be part of the family and get your support.  Your child would function better if they could.

Positive attitude:  yours is not a lost child, there are resources out there to help them, and you really do have the energy to find and use these resources.

Realistic expectations:  brain disorders are termed “disabilities” for a reason.  You cannot expect their lives to unfold like yours did, or even like others their age.  They will redefine what progress means for them.

Support without strings attached:  your teen doesn’t owe you for the life you’ve given them, nor must they pay you back for your extra sacrifices.

Take good care of yourself so you can handle your situation.

Access and use information on the disorder and it’s treatment regime.

Learn and practice an entirely different approach to parenting.

What about youth responsibilities?

My previous post, “Youth with mental disorders demand rights!” presents a document created by members or Youth M.O.V.E (Motivating Others through Voices of Experience), a peer-to-peer organization for teens and young adults http://youthmove.us.  I have a suggestion for M.O.V.E.:  consider developing a youth Responsibilities document.  I believe young people are also responsible for acceptance and realistic expectations, like their parents, as well as being accountable for themselves.

The following list is a good place to look for other ideas.  It was developed by adult mental health consumers (part of this list has been de-emphasized because it does not yet apply to youth).  Everyone, regardless of their medical and mental health situation, should do what they can to take responsibility for their health treatment.

Adult responsibilities that could be applied to youth and young adults:

“In a health care system that protects consumers’ rights, it is reasonable to expect and encourage consumers to assume reasonable responsibilities. Greater individual involvement by consumers in their care increases the likelihood of achieving the best outcomes and helps support a quality improvement, cost-conscious environment. Such responsibilities include:

  1. Take responsibility for maximizing healthy habits, such as exercising, not smoking, and eating a healthy diet.
  2. Become involved in specific health care decisions.
  3. Work collaboratively with health care providers (teachers, parents) in developing and carrying out agreed-upon treatment plans.
  4. Disclose relevant information and clearly communicate wants and needs.
  5. Show respect for other patients and health workers (students, coworkers, neighbors, siblings).
  6. Use the health plan’s internal complaint and appeal processes to address concerns that may arise.
  7. Recognize the reality of risks and limits of the science of medical care and the human fallibility of the health care professional.
  8. Be aware of a health care provider’s obligation to be reasonably efficient and equitable in providing care to other patients and the community.
  9. Become knowledgeable about your health plan coverage and health plan options (when available) including all covered benefits, limitations, and exclusions, rules regarding use of network providers, coverage and referral rules, appropriate processes to secure additional information, and the process to appeal coverage decisions.
  10. Make a good-faith effort to meet financial obligations.
  11. Abide by administrative and operational procedures of health plans, health care providers, and Government health benefit programs.
  12. Report wrongdoing and fraud to appropriate resources or legal authorities.”

 


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Yoga – Safe and effective for depression and anxiety

Yoga – Safe and effective for depression and anxiety
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"Meditating, it makes you calm, and calm. Om."  Andre, 7

"Meditating, it makes you calm, and calm. Om." Andre, 7

Yoga is being taught to and practiced by adults with mental and emotional disorders, including those who are developmentally disabled.  And relatively recently, it is being taught to children and teens with similar challenges.  According to people who suffer brain disorders, a session of yoga has more than physical benefits:

  • Improving mood, and increasing self-esteem and energy
  • Reducing anger and hostility, reducing tension and anxiety, and reducing confusion or bewilderment in developmentally disabled people

Yoga is simple:  a series of gentle poses, postures, stretches, and breathing and physical exercises that can be practiced by most people.  Yoga is safe and anyone can benefit for free.  And from 65% to 73%  report they have been genuinely helped by yoga practice.  Types of yoga used in treatment settings are Iyengar and Hatha yoga (poses and exercise), and Pranayamas (breathing exercises).  The specifics of these types of yoga are best explained in the articloes at the end of this article.

There are a number of research studies showing that yoga qualitatively improves mood as self-reported by adult psychiatric patients (on evidence-based survey instruments, see below).  But yoga has also been shown to help children and teens with serious mental and behavioral disorders.  It is currently being taught in schools for special needs children (ex: Pioneer School in Portland, Oregon) and in psychiatric residential treatment programs for children.

At the end of this post are excerpts from articles on the benefits of yoga for calming, easing anxiety, and reducing depression in children and adults.

For more information on the practice of yoga specifically for troubled and traumatized children and teenagers, there are two organizations that provide yoga classes to help young people feel better, function better, and support their recovery.

The Flawless Foundation – “Creates and supports programs that enrich the lives of children who courageously face challenges of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders on a daily basis.”  http://www.flawlessfoundation.org/

Street Yoga – Street Yoga teaches yoga, mindfulness and compassionate communication to youth and families struggling with homelessness, poverty, abuse, addiction, trauma,  and neurological and psychiatric issues, so that they can grow stronger, heal from past traumas, and create for themselves a life that is inspired, safe, and joyful.   http://www.streetyoga.org/

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Study: Yoga Enhances Mood

Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, August 20, 2010

Research confirms what many have suspected—that yoga has positive effects on mood over other physical activities. In a recent study of 2 randomized groups of healthy participants, it was found that the group that practiced yoga 3 times a week for an hour increased brain gamma aminobutyric (GABA) levels over the other group that walked 3 times a week for an hour.

Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers compared participants’ GABA levels on the first and final day of the 12-week study through magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) imaging. With his colleagues, lead author Chris Streeter, MD, an associate professor of psychiatry and neurology at BUSM

Details available at: Streeter CC, Jensen JE, Perlmutter RM, et al. Yoga Asana sessions increase brain GABA levels: a pilot study. J Altern Complement Med. 2007;13:419-426.

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The effects of yoga on mood in psychiatric inpatients

Roberta Lavey, Tom Sherman, Kim T. Mueser, Donna D. Osborne, Melinda Currier, Rosemarie Wolfe

Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, Volume 28, Number 4 / Spring 2005

Abstract

The effects of yoga on mood were examined in 113 psychiatric inpatients at New Hampshire Hospital.  Participants completed the Profile of Mood States (POMS) prior to and following participation in a yoga class.  Analyses indicated that participants reported significant improvements on all five of the negative emotion factors on the POMS, including tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia, and confusion-bewilderment.  There was no significant change on the sixth POMS factor: vigor-activity.  Improvements in mood were not related to gender or diagnosis.  The results suggest that yoga was associated with improved mood, and may be a useful way of reducing stress during inpatient psychiatric treatment.

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Practitioners using yoga therapy to mend bodies and spirits (excerpt)

By Michelle Goodman, The Seattle Times, January 11, 2006

As Tisha Satow stretches into the standing yoga pose known as Warrior II, she encourages her student Shaun, clad in sneakers, jeans and a Seahawks T-shirt, to adjust his feet.  Across from Shaun, fellow yogi Susan, who travels with a baby stroller occupied by three teddy bears, grips a metal folding chair for balance.

Welcome to yoga therapy, one of the newer recreational activities available to clients of Seattle Mental Health on Capitol Hill. Shaun and Susan, adults who live in group homes and are diagnosed as both developmentally disabled and mentally ill, are regulars in this class, taught weekly by Satow or one of her co-workers at the Samarya Center, a Seattle nonprofit organization devoted to providing yoga to everyone it can, regardless of health issues or finances.

What is yoga therapy? Simply put, it’s the adaptation of yoga breathing, stretching, even chanting techniques to help people with health issues alleviate pain, gain energy and basically feel a heck of a lot better. Who can benefit from it? Anyone from typical backache sufferers to the terminally ill.

“Science is beginning to catch up to this, is beginning to validate this,” says John Kepner, director of the International Association of Yoga Therapists, which has about 1,400 members worldwide.

For the Seattle Mental Health clients, who often attend less glamorous classes such as anger management and checkbook balancing, yoga seems a breath of fresh air. Shaun, who’s shy yet quick to share a laugh with his classmates, says he likes the stretching best. And Susan, who calls yoga “fun” and likes that it gives her a chance to “see people,” shows off her biceps after class so instructor Satow can feel how strong she’s getting.

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Yoga as a Complementary Treatment of Depression:  Effects of Traits and Moods on Treatment Outcome  (excerpt)

David Shapiro; Ian A. Cook; Dmitry M. Davydov; Cristina Ottaviani; Andrew F. Leuchter; Michelle Abrams

Abstract

Our preliminary research findings support the potential of yoga as a complementary treatment of depressed patients who are taking anti-depressant medications but who are only in partial remission.  In this study, participants were diagnosed with unipolar major depression in partial remission.  They took classes led by senior Iyengar yoga teachers.  Significant reductions were shown for depression, anger, anxiety, neurotic symptoms and low frequency heart rate variability.  Of those in the study, 65% achieved remission levels post-intervention.  Yoga is cost-effective and easy to implement.  It produces many beneficial emotional, psychological and biological effects, as supported by observations in this study.

Iyengar yoga classes typically involve sitting and standing poses, inversions (head stand, shoulder stand), breathing exercises (pranayama) and short periods of relaxation at the end of each class (savasana–corpse pose).  An important feature of participation in Iyengar yoga is sustained attention and concentration.  Iyengar theory and practice specifies asanas (poses, postures, positions), and certain asanas have been found to enhance positive mood in healthy (non-depressed) participants.

Previous research on the effects of yoga on mood in non-depressed healthy subjects, suggests the potential of yoga for use in the management of clinical major depression.  In a form of yoga (Hatha Yoga) that has a strong exercise dimension much like Iyengar yoga, subjects reported being less anxious, tense, angry, fatigued and confused after classes than just before class.

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How Hatha Yoga saved the life of one manic depressive.  (excerpt)

By: Amy Weintraub ; Psychology Today Magazine, Nov/Dec 2000

When Jenny Smith was 41 years old, her mental illness became so severe that she could barely walk or speak.  After days of feeling wonderful one moment and hallucinating that spiders and bugs were crawling on her skin the next, she landed in the hospital.

Smith is a victim of bipolar disorder, an illness characterized by oscillating feelings of elation and utter depression.  And though she had tried 11 different medications for relief, some in combination, nothing seemed to work.  Upon leaving the hospital, Smith was told that she could expect to be in and out of psychiatric hospitals for the rest of her life.  Soon after her release, Smith decided to learn Hatha yoga, which incorporates specific postures, meditation and Pranayamas, deep abdominal breathing techniques that relax the body.  As she practiced daily, Smith noticed that her panic attacks—were subsiding.  She has since become a certified hatha yoga instructor, and with the help of only Paxil, Smith’s pattern of severe mood swings seems to have ended.

Key to reaping Hatha yoga’s mental benefits is reducing stress and anxiety.  To that end, Jon Cabot-Zinn, Ph.D., of the University of Massachusetts, developed the Stress Reduction and Relaxation Program (SRRP), a system that emphasizes mindfulness, a meditation technique where practitioners observe their own mental process.  In the last 20 years, SRRP has been shown to significantly reduce anxiety and depression, and thus alleviate mental illness.

Research conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience in India has shown a high success rate—up to 73 percent—for treating depression with sudharshan kriya, a pranayama technique taught in the U.S. as “The Healing Breath Technique.”  It involves breathing naturally through the nose, mouth closed, in three distinct rhythms.

According to Stephen Cope, a psychotherapist and author of Yoga and the Quest for the True Self, “Hatha yoga is an accessible form of learning self-soothing,” he says.”  Yoga students may also benefit from their relationship with the yoga instructor, Cope said, which can provide a “container” or a safe place for investigating, expressing and resolving emotional issues.

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