Category Archives: therapy

Calming room ideas to prevent tantrums for kids with autism or other disorders

Calming room ideas to prevent tantrums for kids with autism or other disorders
11 votes

calmroom1For those with an autistic child, it is a parent’s nightmare to face a tantrum with no way to calm them down.  That is why it is important to have a calming room or area set aside for your child that helps ease distress before a tantrum starts, or to send them to in order to ease the distress. Here are three versions of a calming room you can create to help when your child is about to have a tantrum.

The HUG room

calmroom6The hug room is popular for calming any child down, especially one on the spectrum. The hug room needs to have calming items that provide a sense of security and warmth, and a cocoon-like hug.  In this room, provide a weighted blanket or snug embracing vest (in case your child won’t lay down). Both of these are like bear hugs, which can be comforting and calming for children with autism.  Another great item to have in this space is a crash pad (used by many therapists and parents in combination with a weighted blanket), or a large or stuffed animal or pillow that the child can hold on to or hug.  You want to make sure the animal or pillow does not have parts that can be ripped off and chewed on or cause damage in another way.  You’ll also want all other items to be soft and safe to throw to protect the room or others in case your child does have a full-blown tantrum.

The SOOTHING SOUNDS & SCENTS room

calmroom4One thing that can work very well for some children, especially with tantrums brought on by overstimulation, is a room with soothing sensory experiences. In this room, block or mute outside sounds–TVs, stereos, and people walking or talking near the room so it’s as quiet as possible.  Once your child is in the soothing sounds room, you’ll need to have a place for them to relax or lay down.  You can use a bed, a crash mat, or something else they can fall asleep on or even just sit on with their eyes closed.  Silence or a soft gentle background ‘hum’  or soothing sound helps, such as  from meditation CDs, music or birds or flowing water.

calmroom3You can also try products like the Twilight Turtle which has soothing sounds and even includes a light show of constellations (also perfect for the 3rd room, below).  Noise blocking earmuffs and headphones make great additions for this room if your child needs to be removed from all noises.  These also provide a kind if ‘hug.’  You can combine them with a scent or scented toy or stuffed animals to calm your child.  Think about little pillows stuffed with lavender flowers, or an air freshener they like.

The VISUALLY CALMING room

calmroom7

  • For a visually calming room, remove overly bright colors and small points like those from a static night-light that plugs into the wall.  Instead, find something like the Tranquil Turtle above or even liquid motion lamps or light projectors with calming colors and patterns. You can also try adding black out curtains on the windows to block bright sunlight–the point is to make light easy on their eyes. Darkness may help the lights do a better job.

calmroom2

The most important thing when creating a calming room is to make sure it meets the needs of your child. Include features that are most effective for him or her. Don’t forget to exclude or remove anything that is easily thrown or could hurt your child or others or cause damage to your house.

–This article was provided by Ryan Novas on behalf of National Autism Resources.

Addendum, some other things that calm children (and adults) who are easily overstimulated:

A bubbling aquarium, or a virtual aquarium on a computer monitor

An image of a fire or the rippling surface of water, available as a CD or on a monitor

A mobile or motion toy powered by a solar cell

A clock with a pendulum

Have you discovered something that works for your child?  Please share.

2 Comments

Filed under anxiety, autism, mental illness, stress, therapy, troubled children, troubled children

How to help your child cope with anxiety

How to help your child cope with anxiety
7 votes

anxiety2We all get anxious, but it becomes a “disorder” when it prevents a person from normal functioning. Anxiety and panic are very real, whether triggered by life in general or certain things such as phobias. Take it serious–it’s not something an extremely anxious child can “get over”.  Willpower alone does not work.

Anxiety disorders are also one of the most common psychiatric conditions in children and adolescents, but often go undetected and untreated. Early, effective treatment can reduce the negative impacts on academic and social functioning.

Excessive worry or anxiety about multiple issues, which lingers six months or more, can indicate an anxiety disorder. 

anxiety3Anxiety is often expressed in physical symptoms:

  • Anxious mood: excessive worry, anticipating the worst
  • Tension: startles or cries easily, restlessness, trembling
  • Phobias: fear of the dark, fear of strangers, fear of being alone, fear of animals, etc.
  • Insomnia: difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, nightmares
  • Intellectual difficulties: poor concentration, memory impairment
  • Depression: decreased interest in activities, inability to feel happy
  • Somatic complaints (muscular): muscle aches or pains, teeth grinding
  • Somatic complaints (sensory): ringing in the ears, blurred vision
  • Cardiovascular symptoms: tachycardia, palpitations, chest pain, feeling faint
  • Respiratory symptoms: chest pressure, choking sensation, shortness of breath
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms: difficulty swallowing, nausea or vomiting, constipation, weight loss, abdominal fullness
  • Genitourinary symptoms: frequent or urgent urination, painful menstruation
  • Autonomic symptoms: dry mouth, flushing, pallor, sweating
  • Physical behavior: fidgeting, tremors, pacing
  • Other: risk of abusing alcohol in adolescence, cutting and other self-injury (not suicidal)

Cutting

Physical pain reduces psychological pain by shocking a person’s attention into the here-and-now.  Like a glass of water thrown into someone’s face when they are upset, the shock overrides inner turmoil, and releases adrenalin and endorphins.  It’s stimulating, even energizing.  According to statistics from research, cutting becomes addictive after about 14 episodes.

anxiety6True story: Laurel, age 14, cut herself regularly on her fingers, preferring to cut under her fingernails.  She hid the cuts and scabs with nail polish.  Her father eventually learned about this and asked her why: “I feel more calm because the sting feels good and distracts me.” A therapist recommended that Laurel draw “cuts” on herself with a red pen instead of a knife, and also wear a rubber band on her wrist or fingers and snap it when she wanted to feel a sting.

It is common for cutters to hide their scars or scabs under clothing if they think you will try to stop them, or they will cut in a place you won’t see unless they are unclothed.  They may also make an excuse about an injury if you do see visible cuts.  You can look for unexplained blood on clothing.  Don’t be afraid to ask if they are cutting; many young people have freely ‘confessed’ when asked.

Treatment for anxiety

anxiety5anxiety4A child or teen will often be diagnosed with more than one type of anxiety disorder, in addition to a psychiatric disorder–30% of all anxiety cases include a diagnosis of depression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), in combination with antidepressant medications “have consistently shown efficacy for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.” Many anti-anxiety medications on the market are addictive, so a doctor or psychiatrist will be very cautious about prescribing them except on an as-needed basis. Treatment must also include parent involvement, especially if the parents are also anxious. In the case of cutting, allow your child to cause themselves pain that is harmless, for example:  hold tightly onto ice as long as they can, smell vinegar, taste hot pepper.  These may sound strange, but they are effective techniques used in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) to help an anxious person tolerate stress.  You find out more about CBT and DBT here:  Therapy types explained – DBT, CBT, CPS, and others

How you can help

  • Validate or affirm your child’s feelings. If he or she is worried, fearful, upset, or distraught, don’t insist they should not have their feelings, regardless of the reason. You can let your child know that feelings are normal and it’s OK to have a little fear at times.
  • Reduce their dependence on you. Help them learn to cope by offering less reassurance, which can undermine their commitment and skills for coping. Messages that “everything will turn out OK” teaches them that you will help them through all fears, but they need to learn that they can get through fear on their own.
  • Avoid helping too much. If you try to protect your child from all harm, it prevents them from becoming independent and keeps them socially immature; traits they need to learn in their teens. Learning and maturing require that kids handle challenges on their own by confronting small anxiety hurdles along the way.
  • Model how to cope*. A parent’s anxiety greatly aggravates their child’s anxiety.  If you are anxious, tell your child how you plan to cope with it. For example, “Sometimes I feel nervous when I have to climb a ladder, but I just need to take a deep breath, be careful, and do it. If I get too nervous, I can always climb back down, and try it again later.”

* Charles H. Elliott, Ph.D. “Anxiety: Three Messages to Avoid Giving Kids”

anxiety1Escape plans

If your child is in a situation where they are experiencing severe distress, always have an escape plan or an “out” so your child can leave the situation as quickly as possible. Prepare yourself ahead of time so you won’t feel inconvenienced when it happens, and accept this as part of their treatment needs.

  • This reduces anticipatory anxiety when they are exposed to stress, and teaches them how they can manage themselves on their own. This is also a teachable moment when you reinforce self-calming skills.
  • This builds trust in you and a willingness to listen to your guidance. (When I did this consistently, my child grew more comfortable in similar stressful situations.)

Don’t forget to take care of YOU and your foundation

Keep your energy in balance so you can maintain your family's foundation.  Too much spent on your child affects everything else your family needs to survive.

Keep your energy in balance so you can maintain your family’s foundation. Too much spent on your child affects everything else your family needs to survive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’ve found ways to reduce your child’s anxiety, share them in the Comments section for others to consider.

–Margaret

How am I doing?  Please rate this post above, thank you.

2 Comments

Filed under anxiety, cutting, mental illness, parenting, stress, therapy, troubled children, troubled children

Animals that make good therapy pets

Animals that make good therapy pets
17 votes

Dogs, cats, and “pocket pets” like ferrets, birds, or lizards are therapeutic for children who struggle with any disability: physical, behavioral and developmental. A calm smiling dog, an affectionate cat, or a small pet they can hold is a great therapist. The right animal offers unconditional love and affection, and the right animal makes your child feel special. If you are considering animal therapy or a pet for your child, strategically pick the right animal. Measurable benefits have been seen with many creatures “ranging from dogs, cats, birds, and fish to goats and snakes.”

When finding a pet, monitor your child’s interactions when they are first introduced to the creature. Be honest with yourself, the animal you like may not be the best for your child. Hyperactive and barking dogs, biting cats, fearful hamsters, and noisy birds don’t work and can be outright stressful. Pay attention—people are often unaware how much stress fussy pets generate and how distracting and chaotic they can be.

What is the right animal?

  • The animal’s natural manner fits your child’s emotional needs.
    • Quiet–if child easily experience sensory overload;
    • Soft, active, or affectionate–traits that help a withdrawn or anxious child;
    • Interactive–if your child needs to maintain interest or needs attention: a bird that speaks, or a dog that follows instructions;
  • The animal likes to be with your child for long periods. The animal has a preference for your child.
  • Your child is able to treat the pet humanely. (Animals can be abused consciously or unconsciously by troubled children.)
  • You appreciate the animal too and aren’t concerned about mess, smell, hair, or feathers in your home. You should consider yourself the one responsible for its care. This pet is a therapist first, and not a lesson in responsibility for your child. They can learn responsibility later.
  • The child’s pet should still be welcome and cared for if it doesn’t work out for your child. If it’s not wanted, consider a rescue shelter or humane society that can find another caring owner.

Dogs

Most people are familiar with therapy dogs. Their natural affinity with humans is the reason why dogs are the most popular of pets.  And research shows dogs reduce depression and anxiety.  If you are interested in getting a puppy to train as a therapy dog, you can find instructions on how to train certified therapy dogs, and modify them to fit your home. Certified dogs need significantly more training because they can be used in nursing homes, hospitals, and schools. “How to train a therapy dog”

Birds

The parrots and parrot-like or hooked beak birds have marvelous personalities and will bond with their owner for life. These colorful birds love to perch on a finger or shoulder and spend time with people, other birds, even dogs and cats! The best low-cost option is a parakeet, which is low maintenance, happily chirpy, easily tamed, and easily trained to talk.

“Patients hold and stroke cockatiels so tame that they often fall asleep in a human lap.” Maureen Horton, the founder of “On a Wing and a Prayer” tells of “non-responsive patients in wheelchairs who suddenly begin speaking again while petting a cockatiel as their relatives weep at the transformation.” She described bringing her birds to visit a group of violent teenage delinquents who clamored to touch a cockatoo named Bela. “For a few minutes,” Horton says, “these hardened criminals became children again.”
— “On a Wing and a Prayer,” a pet-assisted therapy program, uses birds to visit patients.” Connie Cronley, Tulsapeople.com

Fish

Fish can’t be held, but few things beat the visual delight and serenity of a beautiful aquarium. Fish do have personalities and form interactive communities in a tank, which are fun to watch, and individuals are fun to name. There is a reason aquariums are common in waiting rooms and clinics, lobbies, and hospitals.  They help people relax and calmly pass the time.

“Pocket pets”

These are usually mammals that like to be cuddled and carried around, often in pockets: ferrets, mice, rats, gerbils, hamsters, guinea pigs, and very small dogs. It is best to select a young animal that is calm and won’t bite, and handle it gently and often so that it becomes accustomed to being held. Challenges with many pocket pets include running away or escaping their enclosures, urine smell, and unwanted breeding. As the main caretaker, you will want to be comfortable with their needs.

Reptiles

Lizards are also excellent pets and demand little attention, and they are readily accepted by children. My bearded dragon, Spike, comes with me to my support groups. Dragons are a very docile species–safe with young children and popular with teens and parents. Other good species are iguanas, and geckos.

“I’d have to say my Leopard Gecko Mindy is very much therapy for me. She really is my therapy lizard, she wants to sit with me when I’m upset and tolerates me, which even my two dogs and cat won’t. She’ll just find a place on me and curl up and be like “I’m here, I won’t leave you.””
–User name “Midori”, Herp Center Network

Horses

Properly trained horses are extraordinarily healing. certified horse therapy programs are considered medically effective treatment and often covered by health insurance. Horses benefit disabled children and teens across the board: those with physical disabilities such as paralysis and loss of limbs, mental/cognitive disabilities such as development disabilities and retardation, and children with mental and behavioral disorders. The horses are selected for their demeanor and trained to reliably respond appropriately to children who may misbehave. Therapists are specially trained also to collaborate with the horse as a team. Horses have a “large” serenity and a lack of concern with the child’s behavior. They are also intelligent and interactive like dogs, provide a warm soft hide to lean on, and they empower their riders. A child on a horse will connect with the animal’s rhythmic bodily movement, which stimulates the physical senses and keeps the child physically and mentally balanced. According to parents and children in these programs, horses change lives.  New research proves horses are genuinely effective:  Study Suggests That Equine Therapy is Effective.

–Margaret

How has your child’s pet improved mental health?
Your comments help others who read this article.


The science behind animal therapy

Are dogs man’s best therapist?
Psychiatric Times. H. Steven Moffic, MD. February 29, 2012

Note: this is an excellent article by a psychiatrist who moved from disbelief to belief that dogs have a genuine therapeutic value, healing some of the most psychiatrically challenging children. http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/blog/moffic/content/article/10168/2040421

Children’s best friend, dogs help autistic children adapt (summary)
Journal: Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2011, Universite de Montreal

Dogs may not only be man’s best friend, they may also have a special role in the lives of children with special needs. According to a new study, specifically trained service dogs can help reduce the anxiety and enhance the socialization skills of children with Autism Syndrome Disorders (ASDs). The findings may lead to a relatively simple solution to help affected children and their families cope with these challenging disorders.

“Our findings showed that the dogs had a clear impact on the children’s stress hormone levels,” says Sonia Lupien, senior researcher and a professor at the Université de Montréal Department of Psychiatry and Director of the Centre for Studies on Human Stress at Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital, “I have not seen such a dramatic effect before.”

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012/03/09/146583986/pet-therapy-how-animals-and-humans-heal-each-other?ps=sh_stcathdl

Pet therapy: how animals and humans heal each other. (summary)
by Julie Rovner, March 5, 2012, National Public Radio

“A growing body of scientific research is showing that our pets can make us healthy, or healthier. “That helps explain the increasing use of animals — dogs and cats mostly, but also birds, fish and even horses — in settings ranging from hospitals and nursing homes to schools, jails and mental institutions.”

“In the late 1970s that researchers started to uncover the scientific underpinnings animal therapy. One of the earliest studies, published in 1980, found that heart attack patients who owned pets lived longer than those who didn’t. Another early study found that petting one’s own dog could reduce blood pressure.

“More recently, says Rebecca Johnson, a nurse who heads the Research Center for Human/Animal Interaction at the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine, studies have been focusing on the fact that interacting with animals can increase people’s level of the hormone oxytocin. “That is very beneficial for us,” says Johnson. “Oxytocin helps us feel happy and trusting.” Which, Johnson says, may be one of the ways that humans bond with their animals over time.”

4 Comments

Filed under animal therapy, anxiety, stress, teenagers, therapy, troubled children

Therapy types explained: DBT, CBT, CPS, and others

Therapy types explained: DBT, CBT, CPS, and others
3 votes

The fantastic news about the brain is that it can heal itself by talking with someone! And there is ample evidence to back this up.

The therapist or psychologist who works with your child or teen will use a type of therapy or “modality” based on their symptoms or diagnosis, because some work better for mood disorders, some work better for defiant children, some work better for borderlines, and so forth. (In thought disorders like autism and schizophrenia, talk therapy has limits. Those on the autism spectrum need specialized interactions due to their processing issues. Those on the schizophreniform spectrum need medication to think logically before starting

Therapy models. Each type of therapy follows a model, and five are covered in this article. Your child’s therapist must be trained and practiced in any model they use. Why? It’s a matter of quality control. A therapist who has fidelity to a model (adheres to protocol) will help the most people most of the time, because that model has data to prove that the majority will benefit–the ones in the center section of the Bell Curve. (Therapists include psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychotherapists with MSW (Masters in Social Work), LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) and other licensure.)

Therapy models

CBT – cognitive behavioral therapy
CBT works when the child can examine their own feelings and make sense of them—the “cognitive” part. They learn to understand what affects them and why. The therapist will guide your child to create a list of options for themselves for when they face the next stressful situation that pops up in their lives. CBT helps a person think their way out of the confusion and have plans in place for appropriate actions. It works for mood disorders and anxiety, and some thought disorders if person has ‘insight’ (able to notice when they are behaving or thinking irrationally). CBT is one of the most widely used therapeutic models because it works for people who are relatively stable but enduring a difficult life situation (divorce, medical illness, job loss, and other big stressors).

DBT – dialectical behavioral therapy
DBT is unusual in that it can help anyone for any reason! The term “dialectical” describes how a patient learns to hold two opposing truths in their mind and respond effectively to the discomfort and emotions this causes. DBT is the one therapy model that can work for people with borderline personality disorder, who are considered the hardest to treat. It also helps those with mood dysregulation, those who’ve thought about or attempted suicide, or those with uncontrollable and negative responses to the world, such as oppositional defiant disorder. DBT relies less on personal self-examination and analysis, and instead concentrates on self calming, tolerating stress without overreacting, accurately perceiving the nature of a conflict, and communicating with others appropriately. Anyone can benefit from DBT. Notice how commonly people hear bad news and immediately expect the worst, then act to address the worst possible outcome? Does your child do this, only to extremes?

EMDR – eye movement desensitization and reprocessing
The goal of EMDR therapy is to help a person process extremely distressing memories of trauma and mitigate their torturous subconscious influence so children and adults can adapt and cope when memories are triggered in the future. EMDR is used for people with PTSD (physical, sexual, or emotional abuse) and other traumas such as from war, accidents, and major disasters. The therapy process uses rhythmic stimuli as a distraction during the precise moments when the person relives the traumatic memory—eye movement back and forth (by following a swinging object or a therapist’s hand), clapping, or listening to tones switching from ear to ear through headphones. The person does not have to talk about the horrible memory, so EMDR is less stressful—so important for a trauma survivor! EMDR works but there are no acceptable explanations. It is based on a belief that the memory and associated stimuli of the event must be processed to remove it from “an isolated memory network” where it creates havoc.

Parents as therapists

There are two proven models of therapy that are taught to parents to practice with their children in the home. Like the other models, they don’t work for every child, but they work for most children with a certain range of behaviors, rages, resistance, and physical violence, which can be caused by ODD, ADHD, and depression/bipolar disorders.

CPS – collaborative problem solving
CPS can be learned by anyone to manage an intensely frustrated child who goes into uncontrollable fits or tantrums, and the parent can do nothing to calm them down. The fits may last hours, and must run out of steam on their own. Afterwards, the child is often remorseful. Why? Their brain is “chronically inflexible” and has difficulty with the unexpected, switching from one situation to another or one plan to another. Using CPS, a parent doesn’t enforce rules per se, but negotiates with child so that they together come up with a win-win solution. This is very counterintuitive! The parent does not give away their authority, but offers the child an acceptable choice. For example, if a child can’t get a red jacket because there aren’t any in their size, and they must have red (!), the parent asks the child if they want to order one and wait 2 weeks, or if they will accept another color. This seems fair to the child because they have a say, and much easier on the parent because the child accepts the outcome they’ve chosen.

PMT – parent management training
PMT refers to a proven intensive educational program for parents to teach them skills for managing extremely difficult children, especially those with ODD. PMT helps parents assert consistency and predictability at home and in school, and promote positive social behavior in their child. The parents are also trained to change their own behavior towards their child, and taught how to analyze different home/school situations, “then apply moment-to-moment positive reinforcement or punishment” (called interventions) based on what is happening. The punishments are humane, such as taking time outs. It is hard on the parents, but works for children with serious behavior problems in addition to ODD: Conduct disorder, ADHD, and autism spectrum disorders.

What makes a good therapist? Because multiple models are out there, a really skilled therapist will figure out which model your child needs once they get to know them, and they will apply parts of different models depending on your child’s individual challenges. That same skilled therapist will also be a cheerleader for your child, helping them feel good about themselves (and you), helping them discover their talents, and helping them to stay committed to their need for self-care. This is the very definition of a good therapist! Therapy is hard to take for anyone, but your child will trust a good therapist if they feel they have their best interests. Chemistry is important. If your child doesn’t like the therapist or make progress, it’s worth spending the time to find someone else who’s a better match. If the therapist has professional ethics; they will recognize they are not a fit and recommend someone else.

I know of a 10-year old child whose therapist dragged out appointments for a year with zero progress or results. From the start, the child didn’t like her and simply refused to talk with her. And this child, now 11, refuses any therapy because “it’s boring and a waste of time.” What an unfortunate consequence!

How you know you have a good therapist. A good therapist will be able to discover something valuable that brings light on your child’s situation after the very first session. They should ask you for background information about your child, and listen to you when you talk about recent problematic situations. They cannot talk to you about your child’s therapy, but they can encourage you to partner with them, and should recognize your need (your family’s need) for your child to function as normally as possible. You can ask to have therapy together with your child if its appropriate. If the therapist can’t connect meaningfully with your child after a few weeks, ask them about this. If you have any doubts about the therapist, share them, and expect to have a thoughtful, respectful explanation.

Which therapy is best for your child?

Seek a therapy provider with knowledge of all of them, and with experience treating children and teens. Ask about a specialty when you make the initial contact, and ask about a model you think fits your child’s behaviors (based on their descriptions). You can get a one-time assessment from a therapist for an opinion on which model to use. The best way to find a good therapist is through personal referrals: your child’s doctor or psychiatrist, support groups, school counselors, and other parents.

2 Comments

Filed under mental illness, parenting, teens, therapy

Naturopathic and holistic mental health treatment

Naturopathic and holistic mental health treatment
7 votes

This guest article is by a naturopathic physician in Portland, Oregon USA, who specializes in mental health treatment for children and adults.  Following is a summary and link of a podcast about the use of holistic/alternative medicine for the treatment of ADHD.

Addressing Mental Health Issues From a Holistic Perspective
Krista Tricarico, ND.  www.openmindmedicine.com

Holistic treatment

The health of the mind and body are intricately linked. Just as our thoughts strongly influence our physical health, our individual physiology affects our mental and emotional well-being. The foods we eat, our digestive health, the toxins in our environments, our hormones, lifestyles, experiences, beliefs and attitudes all play important roles in our physiology and biochemical make-up. As a philosophy, holistic mental health recognizes this beautiful web of interdependency.

Holistic approaches for adults and children can be used in conjunction with psychiatric medication, but unlike pharmaceuticals, holistic mental health treatments usually have the “side effect” of improved physical health and a richer emotional experience. Rather than suppressing or covering up symptoms with a drug, the goal of treatment is to address underlying causes and work towards integration and balance.

As a naturopathic physician, my goal is to support the wisdom of the body and mind and facilitate an individual’s inherent ability to heal. Naturopathic Doctors (ND’s) are licensed primary care physicians who have attended a four-year, postgraduate-level naturopathic medical school and are clinically trained in the art and science of natural therapies. In addition to conventional diagnosis, laboratory testing and pharmaceutical medications, the scope of naturopathic medicine includes nutrition, counseling, homeopathy, botanical medicine, physical therapies, and mind-body approaches. Naturopathic training does encompass the same basic bio-medical sciences as conventional medical training, but the approach to health and disease differs considerably. It is the philosophy of naturopathy that clearly differentiates this medicine and directs how we approach each patient.

Treatments

This will look different for each person and will be guided by conversation and individual interests as well as physical exam and laboratory analysis when appropriate. I have found the following therapies to be key factors in mental health recovery.

Counseling

Some patients see me primarily for counseling, and people with this focus are welcomed. Others are either interested in a blend of counseling and naturopathic approaches or seek care strictly for holistic medical support. A young person’s treatment needs and interests also change over time, so I meet a patient where they are at this moment. My counseling approach has a strong emphasis on self-awareness and mindfulness. Self-observation coupled with an attitude of curiosity, openness and acceptance allows for conscious insight and more freedom in the responses to the stresses and challenges a young person faces daily. Mindfulness-based therapies are a particularly effective approach for depression, anxiety and addiction issues, and can lead to increased clarity and a sense of contentment.

Nutritional Therapies

The foods we eat have a direct impact on the chemistry of our bodies and brains and, therefore, on our mood, thoughts and behavior. Our brains require the correct balance of amino acids, fats, vitamins, minerals and glucose in order to function properly, and individual needs can vary drastically. I work with all patients, children and adults, to uncover their unique nutritional needs through history-taking, diet analysis and lab testing, and then help individuals address underlying biochemical imbalances through shifts in their diet and nutritional supplements. Food allergies or sensitivities can play a significant role in mental health, as well, and the removal of these foods from the diet can have a profound impact on one’s healing. Orthomolecular psychiatry is a field of medicine that has applied these nutrition-based therapies in the treatment of conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression and has helped shape my naturopathic practice.

For more information about orthomolecular medicine, visit www.orthomolecular.org.
For more information about food allergy testing, visit www.usbiotek.com.

Homeopathy

Homeopathy is a gentle yet powerful system of healing based on the principle of “like cures like.” People have observed since ancient times that a substance that causes an illness or symptom can, in very small doses, cure the same problem by stimulating the body’s intrinsic healing ability. Through an in-depth interview, I strive to understand a child’s unique physical, mental and emotional experiences and, after careful study, select the appropriate remedy. Homeopathy offers a safe and elegant treatment that is a natural complement to counseling and can be used alongside conventional medications and other naturopathic treatments. As a truly holistic and individualized form of medicine, it is particularly well-suited to psychological and psychiatric concerns. Although identifying the effective remedy can sometimes require patience and perseverance, the results of successful homeopathic treatment are profound and long-lasting.

Restoring Digestive Health

Many mental and emotional concerns have their origins in the gut. It is important to identify and treat conditions such as hypochlorhydria (low stomach acid), candida overgrowth, gut dysbiosis (a bacterial imbalance in our digestive tracts), parasites, inflammation, leaky gut (increased permeability of the intestinal wall), and food allergies as they have direct effects on brain function. Imbalances in the gut play a significant role in many neuropsychological conditions. Conversely, our emotions strongly influence our appetite and digestion. The nervous system and the digestive system are intricately linked by a constant exchange of chemical and electrical messages including nutrients and neurotransmitters. Anything that affects one realm is likely to affect the other, and I have found that addressing gastrointestinal health is often foundational in one’s mental health recovery.

Blood Sugar Balancing

The sugar in our blood is called glucose, and this is the primary fuel for our bodies. Being one of the most sensitive and demanding organs, our brains require a constant supply of this glucose to perform its never-ending functions. A healthy body is able to regulate the blood sugar to provide a consistent energy source for the brain; unfortunately, this function is commonly impaired. Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the body can’t sustain constant glucose levels and can be a causative factor in attention and behavior issues, anxiety, panic attacks, rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, insomnia and addiction. Elevated blood sugar over time not only leads to diabetes, heart disease and obesity but also mood and behavior disturbances, decreased mental functioning and dementia. Many psychiatric medications put people at additional risk for blood sugar problems only exacerbating this problem. Balancing your blood sugar is an important component of disease prevention and general health and will also support your mood, energy, metabolism and mental functioning.

Amino Acid Therapy

Supplementation with amino acids can help optimize neurotransmitter levels. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins that our bodies transform into neurotransmitters such as serotonin, melatonin, GABA, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine. These are the messenger molecules that allow our nerve cells to communicate and have a direct impact on our mood, learning, attention, pain and pleasure perception, sleep, energy, and thought processes. Most psychiatric drugs manipulate our body’s ability to process these neurotransmitters in an attempt to alter the levels of these important chemicals. Instead of, or in conjunction with, antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications, we can give the body the amino acids it needs to make more neurotransmitters and avoid the negative side effects of the drugs. Neurotransmitter testing is available and can help guide the treatments. Targeted amino acid therapy is a powerful tool for addressing a wide variety of mental health concerns and provides a safe and effective alternative to these medications.

For more information on amino acid therapy, visit www.neuroassist.com.

Balancing Hormones

Our hormones are produced and controlled by our endocrine glands and include chemical messengers such as thyroid hormone, cortisol from the adrenals, insulin from the pancreas, and estrogen, progesterone and testosterone from the reproductive organs. As parents of adolescents who are entering puberty know, hormonal change has a profound effect on behavior. Imbalances or disturbances in any of these interconnected systems can alter the way our brain functions. For example, thyroid dysfunction is an often-overlooked, underlying cause of depression, anxiety, poor memory and fatigue, and PMS is a well-recognized cause of mood swings, depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances. Helping the body regain its delicate hormonal balance can have far-reaching effects for the mind.

Detoxification / Heavy Metal Chelation

We are exposed to an extraordinary amount of toxins through our food supply, the air we breath, and even our tap water. Toxic exposures affect the health of our brains. When the body encounters more toxins than it can effectively process, it stores these chemicals in fat cells, and our brains are largely made up of fat. Some people are good detoxifiers. Others with autism, ADHD, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, depression, chronic fatigue, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are often not. Supporting detoxification and the safe elimination of toxins can be a key component to mental health recovery. I assist patients with appropriate detoxification strategies whether that is a gentle cleanse, a more intensive detox protocol or heavy metal chelation.

Mind / Body Treatments 

Mind/body treatments engage the power of your mind in your own process of healing. I use therapies such as breath work, meditation, memory reintegration, relaxation strategies, and Emotional Freedom Technique (www.emofree.com) to help patients move towards a state of awareness and peace. Reflecting on and connecting with one’s own spirituality can also be an effective stress-management tool. Learning to consciously calm the mind and relax the body has a powerful effect on our neurotransmitters, hormones and immune system, and ultimately our health and sense of well-being.

Dr. Krista, www.openmindmedicine.com


Foods that support brain and mental health

  • Avocado
  • Walnuts, almonds, other nuts and seeds
  • Salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, herring, trout
  • Ground flax seed
  • Brightly colored fruits and vegetables – eat the rainbow
  • 70% cacao and higher dark chocolate
  • Green tea (stone ground from whole tea leaves)
  • Berries:  acai, blueberry, cranberry, blackberry

Herbs and other alternatives that support brain and mental health 

  • Fish, cod liver or krill oil (if you could only have one thing, this would be it)
  • L-theanine or kava kava for calming and reducing anxiety
  • Turmeric, curry and other antioxidants
  • B-complex vitamins
  • Magnesium
  • Light therapy, for improved mood and energy

Substances that are bad for brain health

  • Alcohol
  • Artificial food coloring
  • Artificial sweeteners
  • Sugars: cane sugar, soft drinks, corn syrup
  • Hydrogenated/partially hydrogenated fats and trans fats (fried foods). Saturated fats are fine, it’s the hydrogenated and trans fats that are bad.  I actually highly recommend organic coconut oil
  • Nicotine, Marijuana, all other controlled substances

How do you like this article?  Please rate it at the top, thanks.

Integrative Management of ADHD – What the Evidence Suggests
By Richard Balon, MD | January 6, 2011

The use of complementary and alternative medicine treatments by children and adults with ADHD is the rule rather than the exception…more than half of parents who have children with ADHD treat their child’s symptoms with vitamins, dietary changes, and expressive therapies—but only a small minority tell their doctor. And roughly 8 out of 10 patients who use these treatments regard them as their primary therapy.

Leave a Comment

Filed under mental illness, naturopathic medicine, therapy, yoga